What is an outbreak of fibromyalgia?

The second most common question asked people living with fibromyalgia (or any invisible chronic disease) next to  What is fibromyalgia  is?  What is an outbreak of fibromyalgia?

If you know someone who lives with this disease, you have probably heard that they say at one time or another that they are having an “outbreak.” Trying to express what you mean by flash is perhaps one of the hardest things to do, especially since the flashes look so different to each person.

Surprisingly, trying to explain an outbreak is as difficult as trying to understand an outbreak, which is why many of us who live with the disease avoid talking completely about our symptoms.

However, education, awareness and knowledge are important when it comes to any chronic, fibromyalgia or other illness, and it is only through explanation that help all people understand the true ubiquitous nature of all chronic invisible illnesses and help understand better the way we live. each day.

It is only through explanation that we help all people understand the truly omnipresent nature of chronic invisible diseases and help everyone better understand what we live day after day.

In short, “Talking about our illness is the only way we can get the support, empathy and understanding we need caregivers, health care professionals, family members and the general public.

That said, the article below (taken from Arthritis.org) provides the simplest and most concise explanation of the “green shoots” of fibromyalgia and hope that everyone who reads can understand a little better what we experience each of these. chronicles. And every day.

What is a fibromyalgia flare courtesy of Arthritis.org?

While a person with  fibromyalgia  may experience some symptoms regularly, when symptoms worsen or occur more often over a period of time called an outbreak.

“An outbreak is worsening or exacerbation of symptoms that already exist,” says Daniel Clauw, MD, professor of anesthesiology, rheumatology, and psychiatry at the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor. “Patients use different time frames for what they consider an outbreak, but are usually days or weeks of worsening symptoms. Anything less is considered normal hair removal and a decrease in symptoms that a person with fibromyalgia can expect.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *